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“The fuel of the future is going to come from fruit like that sumach out by the road, or from apples, weeds, sawdust—almost anything. There is fuel in every bit of vegetable matter that can be fermented.” — Henry Ford

Alcohol Fuel And Why It Was So Important

Alcohol fuel made its way into the world in the 18th century. And by the early 19th century, Henry Ford created his model T to run either on alcohol or gasoline.

Henry Ford wanted to make cars people could afford.

Ford was a supporter of alcohol fuel at the time. He felt it was extremely important to boost the market, which would help independent American farmers capitalize from it.

Alcohol fuel was supported by many. It was seen as a way to break free from the monopoly created and owned by the oligarchs.

Farmers lobbied to revoke a $2.08 per gallon alcohol tax. One of the supporters of the bill was former President Teddy Roosevelt. The bill was revoked in 1906 and corn ethanol became 14 cents a gallon which was cheaper than the 22 cents for gasoline.

“The Standard Oil company has, largely by unfair or unlawful methods, crushed out home competition. It is highly desirable that an element of competition should be introduced by the passage of some such law that which has already passed the House, putting alcohol used in the arts and manufactures upon the free list.” — Teddy Roosevelt

A renewable and stable alternative, alcohol fuel would help maintain economic growth for the American people. It was cheap, could be grown abundantly and be produced independently.

The Oligarchs Felt Threatened 

The oligarchs, mainly comprised of the Rockefellers, the Rothschilds and the Nobels at the time, felt threatened. They opted for plan that would restrict the use of alcohol fuel.

The Oligarchs Promoted The Anti- Alcohol Movement To Eliminate The Threat 

In the past, there were no to little restrictions on alcohol consumption. Children as young as 15 were drinking alcohol. The average American would consume more than seven gallons of alcohol a year.

America had a drinking problem which created the anti-alcohol movements. This, in turn, gave John D. Rockefeller the opportunity to use the crisis to his advantage.

The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union

The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union was a movement that made significant strides in their attempt to ban alcohol. Because of the particular movement, Maine outlawed selling and manufacturing of alcohol. The ban lasted 5 years. Their efforts wasn’t nearly enough to affect the entire country.

John D. Rockefeller understood that using the anti- alcohol movement was an opportunity to defeat the thing he viewed a threat to his throne. The movement meant an end to alcohol which meant the end of alcohol fuel.

The Anti- Saloon League

In 1893, the Anti- Saloon League (ASL) was formed by Howard Hyde Russell who was a close friend of John D. Rockefeller himself.

Funded annually by Rockefeller, ASL became a force to be reckoned with. Their intent was simple, to get rid of alcohol. No one, including political leaders, could stand in their way. If and when they did, there were dire consequences.

Prohibition of Alcohol

ASL succeeded and the prohibition of alcohol passed in 1918.

Although the prohibition didn’t completely ban the use of alcohol fuel, it did lead to restrictions. These restrictions had weird side effects that prompted producers to add petroleum to the ethanol so alcohol would be poisonous enough where people wouldn’t consume it.

The consequence, around 10,000 Americans were poisoned. Alcohol fuel couldn’t compete with gasoline anymore and so it was abandoned.

The prohibition lasted until 1933 before it was abolished due to it’s violent aftermath.

The threat to the oligarchy was destroyed and in it’s place stood a threat to humanity.